What is Diabetes?

What is Diabetes?

About one-third (1/3) of individuals with diabetes are unaware they have diabetes. If not controlled, diabetes is a serious disease that can lead to other severe health
conditions including vision problems (including blindness), kidney failure, nerve damage, amputations (legs, toes, feet) and significantly impact daily living.
Diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot change  sugars and starches (carbohydrates) into energy. This happens when the body cannot make enough insulin or
cannot use the insulin it makes. As a result, extra sugar in the blood can lead to damage in the blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, heart, and nerves.

TYPE 1 DIABETES
A medical condition in which the body makes no insulin or so little insulin that the body cannot change blood sugar into energy.
Type 1 diabetes usually develops during childhood or adolescence, before a woman becomes pregnant. Insulin helps the body use glucose from food for energy. People
with Type 1 need to take insulin every day.

TYPE 2 DIABETES (MOST COMMON)
A medical condition in which the body produces too little insulin or cannot use the insulin properly to change blood sugar (glucose) into energy.
Individuals diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes may require medication along with other lifestyle changes: dietary changes and physical activity modification to manage their
diabetes condition.